Auditory Processing Disorders

Auditory processing disorders (APD) are real, and thoroughly documented by neuroscience research. APD in children is associated with academic underachievement, reading failure, and serious psychosocial problems. Adults with APD, perhaps secondary to traumatic brain injury (TBI), cannot communicate effectively, with secondary problems with family, work, and school. Diagnosis of APD, and differentiation from common coexisting disorders (e.g., language impairment, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, or ADHD, cognitive deficits) is possible with a clinical feasible test battery including behavioral and electrophysiologic procedures. Evidence-based management strategies are available for effective intervention for APD. If you are interested in APD (and if you've read this far, then I would assume you are), download and closely study the 2010 American Academy of Audiology (AAA) Clinical Guidelines on APD (www.audiology.org). Then read the articles and view the PPT presentations available here.

To give you a glimpse of the material covered in the available PPT presentations, I've included here an abstract for a lecture on APD in children, followed by another abstract that focuses on APD in adults with traumatic brain injury (TBI).

Abstract: There is unprecedented interest in auditory processing disorders (APD) among audiologists, speech pathologists, and parents of children who are academic underachievers. Differential diagnosis of APD is challenging for many audiologists. Assessment procedures and protocols extend far beyond the audiogram, and treatment strategies are highly varied and must be closely coordinated with other professionals. Furthermore, APD must be differentiated from among a variety of coexisting disorders, such as dyslexia, language impairment, and ADHD. This session provides the clinical audiologist or speech pathologist with a practical and logical multidisciplinary approach for assessment and management of this substantial and under-served clinical population that based on a foundation of basic and applied science. The session provides the clinician with practical take-home messages.

Abstract: There is unprecedented interest in auditory processing disorders (APD) among audiologists, speech pathologists, and other health professions. Differential diagnosis of APD is challenging for many audiologists. Assessment procedures and protocols extend far beyond the audiogram, and treatment strategies are highly varied and must be closely coordinated with other professionals. Furthermore, in the adult TBI patient APD must be differentiated from among a variety of co-existing disorders, such as peripheral hearing loss, cognitive deficits, and language impairment. This session provides the clinical audiologist or speech pathologist with a practical and logical multidisciplinary approach for assessment and management of the TBI population that is based on a foundation of basic and applied science. The session provides the clinician with practical take-home messages.

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James W. Hall III       |       jwhall3phd@gmail.com